French Expressions

By

On y va & Allons-y !

To say  ”Let’s go there”  you can say  “On y va” or “Allons-y “ !     Notes: Make sure you make the liaison when you pronounced these 2 phrases. “Making the liaison” means that the last consonant of a word is linked with the vowel which begins the following word. On_ y va is…

By

Ça ne mange pas de pain!

You can often hear this expression among french people. Literal translation: That doesn’t eat any bread! Actual Meaning: That doesn’t cost much OR There’s no harm in trying ! So why not trying something because it doesn’t cost much and entails no risk! 😉 Ex: Téléphone à ton médecin, ça ne mange pas de pain! Notice: In…

By

Ça marche!

The expression “ça marche” is often used in everyday situations when someone agrees with what has just been said. Literal translation: That walks Actual meaning: Ok, that works!   Ex 1 – Tu peux venir à 6 heures ce soir. You can come at 6pm. – Ok, ça marche !  Ok that works!  But you…

By

I Don’ t Care…

“Je m’en fiche” is a familiar expression that means  “I don’ t care”…   But you will often hear people say “Je m’en fous” which is even more familiar than “Je m’en fiche” but used quite a lot in a conversation.   Note: As you can hear, we don’t often pronounce “e” of  “je”  in…

By

Oh la la ça craint…

“ça craint” is a colloquial expression used quite commonly by French people. It either means  “it sucks” or “it’s dangerous”. Look at the 2 examples below. Je n’ai pas envie d’y aller, ça craint !    I don’t want to go there, it sucks ! Ne sors pas tard le soir, ça craint !  …

By

Qu’est-ce que tu fabriques?

This is an expression that is used in spoken French and that means “What are you doing?” but in a more accusative way. So it is mainly used in a situation in which someone is waiting impatiently & asking “What the heck are you doing?” so  “Qu’est-ce que tu fabriques?”

By

Je suis crevé(e)

Familiar Expression/slang: je suis crevé(e) Pronunciation: /shui crevay/ (when a French native speaker says it, it sounds more like a “shui” than “je suis”) Literal Translation: I am flat Actual Meaning: I am knackered Note: “Crevé” is usually used when speaking about a flat tyre or a balloon that is punctured. “J’ai crevé” would usually refer…